STRATEGIES TO REDUCE EMPLOYEE TURNOVER IN YOUR RESTAURANT

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Nevertheless of geographical size, geographic location, theme, or target clientele, all restaurants have one major concern in common: employee turnover. Aside from inventory turnover, employee turnover are usually one of the largest expenses for a business, but the exact expense of it isn’t always easy to measure and find out. Reducing employee turnover should always be part of your restaurant’s overall cost saving strategy. Finding great restaurant employees can be a time-consuming and costly endeavor. Making every effort to keep your best staff members around for the long haul will give you peace of mind that your business is always in good hands, and frees up more of your time and energy.

Finding the delicate balance between enough staff to cover the dinner rush and keeping your budget in check is not an easy task. Let’s dig into a few ways to cut down on employee turnover.

  • KEEP EYES ON SALES DATA

Look at sales data when you’re scheduling so you can be sure you aren’t overspending on labor during your slow periods. When you connect your point of sale system to your scheduling software, like bill history/report, you’ll get all the data you need in one place. Looking at the last few weeks of data, you’ll get estimates of sales for a given shift, so you can keep your labor cost percentage in check and operate it based on that.

  • HIRE ONLY THE RIGHT FIT

We sound like a siren on this, but it really is one of the most important things to keep in mind when operating a service establishment. Many have the skills, fewer have the attitude. You have to resist the urge to fill available positions with the first semi-acceptable applicant that walks in. Whenever possible, hold out for the right person. A quick hire of the wrong candidate means a quick exit, and you’re back to square one.

Avoid over staffing: A few extra employees per shift may not seem like a major expenditure, but even minimum wage adds up quickly. In addition, too many servers on the floor means everyone takes home less tip money–which can easily deflate morale.

Instruct your managers to Hire smart and quality candidates with:

Experience: Whenever possible, go for experience; they’ll need less training, so they’re on the floor faster and allowing your managers to focus on guests rather than worrying about new employees.

Loyal work histories: You want candidates who will stick so you can invest time and money in training them.

  • EMPOWER THROUGH TRAINING

Veteran or New employees will cost time and money when they are under performing. By improving employee efficiency through training, you can conceivably schedule a leaner staff without sacrificing service.

proper planing: First step toward training is Create a proper plan to train employees. It should cover everything from the initial guest greeting through dropping the check, and will make it easier to eliminate superfluous steps and evaluate individual employee performance.

Cross-train your staff: Train new employees in all areas of the restaurant when they first start, so they develop an understanding of how the restaurant functions as a whole keeping BOH and FOH separate, of course. Not only will this increase overall functionality, staff members will also be better equipped to jump in and assist employees in other positions should the need arise.

Hold regular staff meetings: Holding pre-shift meetings as each set of staff hits the floor is a great way to relay new policies, menu changes, and other important items, leading to fewer mistakes and greater efficiency.

Conduct regular staff reviews: Evaluate your employees’ performances to identify where your team can improve individually and as a whole. Know your priorities, and provide management with a pre-determined reference to ensure that they evaluate the things that will help the team consistently deliver excellent service.

  • PROPER SCHEDULING

Resection your floor chart: Inefficient floor charts could mean restaurants are over staffing just to cover sections that are underused. Examples of this may be: scheduling someone in a particular section from 5-12 pm, when the section doesn’t get busy until 10 pm. Servers could share another section until 10 pm or take on the other area as well.

Review policies: Set clear guidelines as to when employees can clock in, clock out, take breaks, and do side work, and utilize a POS system that logs employee hours to help monitor staff compliance. Scheduling is arguably the most important factor influencing labor costs. While it can be difficult to minimize staffing costs while also maintaining guest expectations, smart scheduling can alleviate some of the more pressing issues.

Automate scheduling: Computer schedulers or online restaurant management systems make schedules mobile, allowing managers to post schedules online and employees to swap or pick up shifts via their computers or mobile phones(with managers reserving final approval). This prevents last-minute staff shortages and other scheduling complications.

Thus we can fairly conclude that, To maintain a well balanced restaurant operation keep a keen insight into the hiring practice and staff desires can reduce your employee turnover, hiring strong team members and give them the training they need to succeed, regularly reviewing operational processes to ensure efficiency and Crafting a thoughtful schedule that takes both guest and staff needs into account.

If you have more suggestions on this topic, please feel free to share with us.

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